Foster carers have faith

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Foster carers have faith

Key AssetsI was speaking to one of our foster carers the other day about the importance of spiritual faith in their lives. It was interesting to hear how they draw on their faith as a source of support and guidance particularly when it comes to thinking about the best way to manage or walk through a challenging time.

The young person they care for is someone who has experienced significant trauma and rejection and as such, they have worked incredibly hard to create a safe and stable environment. This is evident in the way the young person has settled and just how well they are doing at school. The early days were not always easy but these people with faith stood firm and worked through things.

It made me think about how their spiritual faith helped them see a bigger picture in terms of the potential of this young person, but they also had ‘faith’ in the ability of the young person to overcome and achieve. I recognise that this value or approach is not exclusive to foster carers with spiritual faith. The dictionary describes faith as;

‘Confident belief in the truth, value, or trustworthiness of a person, idea, or thing or; Belief that does not rest on logical proof or material evidence or; Loyalty to a person or thing’

This is a mark of all good foster carers, their ability to see beyond the behaviour, beyond the emotional avoidance, beyond the need to reject before they think they will be rejected (let’s face it adults have let these kids down!) by reinforcing the intrinsic value that children and young people have and showing positive regard at every opportunity.

Experience has shown us this works and it is this very approach which helps children and young people to heal from their horrible early life experiences. A number of foster carers I know in and around Brisbane and the South East and West of Queensland, have an active spiritual faith and this has been a contributing factor in their motivation to foster. I guess the faith communities have always been a source for foster carers. The motivation is not to convert or persuade a young person to join a faith group (that would worry me) but underpinned by a belief that children have the right to grow up in caring environments where their physical, emotional, cultural educational and spiritual needs are met.

The carer I was speaking with told me that fostering was one way that they put their ‘faith in action’ and for someone who does not actively practice a faith I understood what they meant and I welcome this.

Key Assets welcomes people of all spiritual backgrounds or none at all to apply to be foster carers as long as they have the ‘faith’ that they can truly make a difference to the lives of children and young people. Contact us if you’d like to know more.

Are you considering Fostering in Queensland? If so why not enquire online or call us on 1800 93 22 73.